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The Unbelieveable & Staggering Growth Of WordPress

 

In 2016, A2 Hosting became more involved in the WordPress community. A big portion of this initiative was to sponsor and personally attend a number of WordCamps. If you’ve ever attended a WordCamp before, you know that you’re bound to take home a huge amount of valuable information. Just some of the specific news we learned about WordPress in 2016 included:

 

  • WordPress places great importance on its “cousin” projects like BuddyPress and bbPress as each offers users the ability to extend the functionality of their install.
  • WordPress becomes more and more multilingual friendly with each version release.
  • Just as it did in 2016, WordPress encourages its users to continue to learn JavaScript “deeply” into 2017 and beyond.
  • A hosting environment featuring HTTPS and PHP 7 is now officially recommended by WordPress.
  • The adoption of WordPress’ management interface Calypso continues to explode. Powering the WordPress admin with the Rest API is a key goal for 2017.
  • Other goals for 2017 include making the user experience faster, easier and more powerful.

 

Something else we learned about WordPress is that usage, not surprisingly, has rapidly increased. The stats are staggering! Take a moment and consider that a WordPress post is published every 19 seconds! Also consider the fact that the platform’s downloads are up 560% over the past 5-years. View unbelievable statistics like these and learn more about the growth of the software in our WordPress Growth infographic below.

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About Corey Hammond

Corey has been directly involved in the web hosting space since 2010 and leads marketing for A2 Hosting.

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